Church Interior
When a teenage girl becomes a battleground for good and evil,
only pure faith can broker peace.

The Corruption of Divine Providence

IN THEATRES MAY 7 2021

2_edited.png
2021_BONEHEAD_LAURELS-2off_edited.png
OFFICIAL SELECTION - NICE International
international%252520narrative%252520feat
OFFICIAL SELECTION - Julien Dubuque Inte

SYNOPSIS

Division and discontent roil beneath the surface of the seemingly peaceful bilingual farm community of St-Michel, Manitoba. When the troubled teenager Jeanne Séraphin is nearly killed by mysterious bleeding, the news triggers a frenzy of worship from people looking for a miracle.

 

The Catholic Church, Dakota elders, and an American Pentecostal preacher all vie for access to the young woman, seizing on her suffering to validate their beliefs. For Jeanne’s father Louis -a Métis bar owner ashamed of his heritage - her ordeal is an opportunity to cash in and gain the town’s respect. Jeanne’s mother Danielle questions her marriage, her choices, and the existence of God altogether, plunging further into despair when the teen is abducted. But a sage mystic appears, rescues Jeanne from a fallen angel, and makes sense of the strange phenomena that surround her.

 

Jeanne’s message that divinity can coexist with mortal sins quickly separates true believers from false prophets. It will be up to each individual to choose their righteous path

Credits

a film by JEREMY TORRIE

with ELYSE LEVESQUE, ALI SKOVBYE, DAVID RICHARD LA HAYE, TANTOO CARDINAL,

PAUL AMOS, EUGENE BRAVE ROCK and COREY SEVIER

produced by TANYA BRUNEL      executive producers PAUL CADIEUX, BILL MARKS and SERGE NOEL

editor GEOFF KLEIN      original score by ALAIN SAVOIE      director of photography ERIC CAYLA

 production designer DONNA NOONAN      costume designer NOLA CHATERS

 

NEWS & REVIEWS

'The Corruption of Divine Providence' Is a Fresh Take on Classic Horror Conventions
There is no genre better suited to making explicit all the ways in which we destroy teenage girls than horror. And when you add some religion to that equation you not only make things more interesting, you also prompt existential dread. Horror is, after all, how we face our anxieties and thereby expel them. The Corruption of Divine Providence is such a film, but it's also on another level. 
With The Corruption of Divine Providence, Torrie has given us a meandering yet hopeful horror film. This movie is at times devilishly campy in the manner of The Devil's Advocate, and will reward with multiple rewatches. The entire lens through which it's told is so refreshing and deeply Canadian that it holds up admirably in the canon of horror films about teenage girls.
 

The Corruption of Divine Providence, the film that Torrie wrote and directed, will have its Canada-wide release today, Tuesday, May 25. It will debut via video on demand and early electronic sell-through, distributed in English Canada via Vortex Media.

“I want everybody to be able to experience it because you can definitely say you’ve never seen anything like this before,” said Torrie, an Ojibwe from Wauzhushk Onigum First Nation in northwest Ontario.

Sam Laskaris - Windspeaker

“The Corruption of Divine Providence” a gripping look at the state of religion today.

Produced by the Winnipeg-based White Bear Films, this film is both gripping and disturbing. It’s also a glaring statement of the state of religion in North America today, whether it be from the mystical, traditional or charismatic viewpoint. As well, it shows how greed and ego can be so counter-productive towards the search for faith, as these three factions indirectly battle each other to see who can claim for themselves the divine right of possessing Jeanne to boost their respective religion.

“The Corruption of Divine Providence” may have some traces that’s reminiscent of The Exorcist, but it gives the viewer some food for thought of what people would go through for religious enlightenment, and the quest for fame and fortune that can turn a religious miracle into a false prophet.

Stuart Nulman - Montreal Times

Torrie has directed a surprisingly slick thriller, with some scenes that even reference THE EXORCIST. The film was workshopped at WFF’s Producers Lab in 2016 in its development process. A truly original piece of cinematic exploration that asks the question: is religion there to console and offer hope? Or can it be used to beguile, manipulate and seduce? In this version, maybe only a sixteen year-old Métis woman can tell the difference.

Whistler Film Festival

Director Jeremy Torrie is Hopeful for the Future of Indigenous Filmmaking
Director Jeremy Torrie knows the power of Indigenous storytelling and strives to take back ownership for him and his fellow Indigenous creatives around the world. In his most recent feature, The Corruption of the Divine Providence (2020), Torrie explores the tension within Indigenous communities surrounding religion, specifically the contrast between traditional spirituality and Christianity. As an aadizookewinini (‘storyteller’ in Ojibwe), Torrie understands the power and importance of Indigenous storytelling and spirituality more than most.
Ali-Skovbye-Jeanne-Seraphin-13-©-White-B

Rachel Ho

“We have an incredible selection of films this year that can only be described as ​unprecedented​. A daring, dynamic program that pushes boundaries and viewers out of their comfort zone. The roster is iconoclastic and dynamic with storylines and themes that empower historically marginalized communities.”

Reelworld Film Festival

 
 
JOIN THE MAILING LIST

Thanks for submitting!

  • Facebook